Showing posts with label 1950's. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1950's. Show all posts

Thursday, 1 June 2017

Giftage and An Outfit Post

While washing up the other day, I saw a Parcel Force van pull up. For a moment I thought, please be in, I don't want to take in packets for the neighbours as all too often, it's the same places and they either don't come for their packet, we have to go to them, or it's for the people who completely blank us. Good enough to take in your parcels, but not good enough to say hello when we're right outside? No, I don't want any part of that nonsense. Manners cost nothing.

Anyway, there was a knock on our door straight away and I was handed a packet. I could not think why it was being delivered here, unless it was a late birthday gift for Andy, but no, it was for me! From Ann!

I had been looking through the telly listings when I saw a mini documentary (5 minutes long) was being shown, about the Brussels Expo '58 event, and mentioned it to Ann, who had done two blog posts about the event, which I loved. She was kind enough to offer to send me a book and DVD of Expo 58!

She also sent me a beautiful pale green scarf. Greens and purples together make me very happy, it's a favourite colour combination of mine. I also like fuchsia and emerald green.



There was also a bird brooch, which is so delicate! I love it. Andy commented that it looks Christmassy. It's the gold bird right in the middle of the picture.

These brooches are a combination of childhood ones (the butterfly, Golly, Bambi and the blue one), gifts, inherited and lucky finds in charity shops, vintage emporiums and the antique shop I strike gold in regularly.



There was also a flamingo card. Thank you so much Ann, you're an angel xxx

I thought I would also, while I'm here, and while I was remembering to take photos (but while I was also forgetting to take pictures of the card and Expo items!) show the gloves I got for Christmas from my mum and step dad. Aren't they pretty. They're brand new Dents gloves and it's a shame, but they're just a smidge loose, but I have small hands and slender fingers, so it was inevitable. They're certainly wearable though.


A quick outfit to end with. I have tried to get outfit shots for my blog on numerous occasions, but seem to have been left with endless photos of myself that I just don't like, most likely to do with having two months of being terribly poorly, with no break between episodes, merely an overlap, making me feel twice as terrible. I look worn down and tired most of the time.
I have but two photos to share.

Black vintage hair scarf - gift from Vix
Polka dot Western style blouse - retail, had for a few years now
Belt - Hell Bunny
Circle Skirt - Lindy Bop
Petticoats x 2 - eBay, two because they have lost oomph
Ballet Flats - retail, they have a hole in the sole but are better than the newer ones I have



I then went out in this outfit, with my heels on and got myself two compliments from people on the street, so that made me feel a bit better about everything :)





Friday, 26 May 2017

B-Movie Madness: The Thing From Another World 1951

Today's b-movie is 1951's The Thing From Another World.
It stars Kenneth Tobey, seen previously in It Came From Beneath The Sea



Scientists and American Air Force officials fend off a blood-thirsty alien organism while at a remote arctic outpost.


 Close-ups of "The Thing" were removed. It was felt that the make-up could not hold up to close scrutiny. However, the lack of close-ups gave the creature a more mysterious quality.


 The scene in which The Thing is doused with kerosene and set ablaze is believed to be the first full body burn accomplished by a stunt man.


  James Arness plays The Thing ...


... but he is difficult to recognize in costume and makeup due to both low lighting and other effects used to obscure his features. He reportedly regarded his role as so embarrassing that he didn't attend the premiere. He also complained that his "Thing" costume made him look like a giant carrot.

Rawr! Beware the carrot!


When producer Howard Hawks attempted to get insurance for the creature, five insurance companies turned him down because "The Thing" was to be frozen in a block of ice, hacked by axes, attacked by dogs, lit on fire, and electrocuted.


*

Did I like this?
No. No I didn't.
I was bored, distracted and only watched the whole thing so I could see The Thing.
I also didn't like any of the characters and I think you need to at least like the characters in a film (or book) to give you the incentive to continue.

And that brings us to the end of another of Melanie's stellar b-movie reviews 😉

Friday, 12 May 2017

B-Movie Madness: It Came From Outer Space 1953



"Then at a deadly pace
It came from outer space ..."



A spaceship from another world crashes in the Arizona desert, and only an amateur stargazer and a schoolteacher suspect alien influence when the local townsfolk begin to act strangely.
Originally shown in 3D.



Author and amateur astronomer John Putnam (Richard Carlson) and schoolteacher Ellen Fields (Barbara Rush) watch a large meteorite crash near the small town of Sand Rock, Arizona. They awaken a neighbor, who has a helicopter, and all three fly to the crash site.

Putnam climbs down into the crater and notices a partially buried round object in the crater's pit. He comes to the realization, after he sees a six-sided hatchway close, that this isn't a meteorite but a large alien spaceship. The hatchway's noise starts a landslide that completely buries the craft. Putnam's story is later scoffed at by Sand Rock's sheriff (Charles Drake) and the local news media.






Even Ellen Fields is unsure about what to believe but still agrees to assist Putnam in his investigation. Over the next several days, local people disappear; a few return, but they act distant or appear somewhat dazed.

Convinced by these and other odd events, Sheriff Warren comes to believe Putnam's story that the meteorite is actually a crashed spaceship with alien inhabitants; he then organizes a posse to hunt down the invaders at their crash site. Putnam, however, hopes to reach a peaceful solution to the looming crisis.

Alone, he enters a nearby abandoned mine, which he hopes will eventually connect to the now buried spaceship and its alien occupants.


Putnam finally discovers the spaceship and learns from its crew that they crashed on Earth by accident; the aliens appear benign and only plan to stay on Earth just long enough to repair their damaged craft and then continue on their voyage.

The aliens' real appearance, when finally revealed to Putnam, is entirely non-human: they are large, single-eyed, jelly fish-like beings that seem to glide across the ground, leaving a glistening trail that soon vanishes. They are also able to shape shift into human form using a telepathy screen in order to appear human and move around, unobserved, in order to collect their much needed repair materials.


To do this, they copy the human forms of the local townspeople they've secretly kidnapped to help them repair their crippled spacecraft. In doing so, however, they fail to reproduce the townspeople's exact personalities, leading to suspicion and eventually to the deaths of two of the aliens ...



Did you know ... This was one of the few American films from the 1950s to place its credits at the end rather than at the beginning.

***

This has been my favourite by far to date (that didn't feature Grant Williams *cough*).
I really enjoyed this one, so if you see it on, give it a go!

Monday, 8 May 2017

Ricky Nelson




Eric Hilliard "Ricky/Rick" Nelson
May 8th 1940 – December 31st 1985

Ricky, or Rick as he preferred to be known, was anAmerican actor, musician
and singer-songwriter. He starred alongside his family in the television series
The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet as well as co-starring alongside John Wayne
and Dean Martin in Howard Hawks's western feature film Rio Bravo.


He placed 53 songs on the Billboard Hot 100 between 1957 and 1973 including "Poor Little Fool", which holds the distinction of being the first #1 song on Billboard magazine's then-newly created Hot 100 chart.


He recorded 19 additional Top 10 hits and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on January 21, 1987.

I want to focus for a moment on his role of Colorado Ryan in Rio Bravo.
In the latter part of the film, he sings a duet with Dean Martin and then a song called 'Cindy'

"Cindy hugged and kissed me
She wrung her hands and cried
Swore I was the prettiest thing
That ever lived or died
"

Well she was right there, he was a beauty.
There's just something about his lips ...








Today would have been his 77th birthday, so happy birthday Rick!


It would also have been my granddad's 86th birthday!
Happy birthday granddad!


And it's the anniversary of VE Day!

Friday, 21 April 2017

B-Movie Madness: Fire Maidens From Outer Space 1956

Have I got a treat for you today! 1956's Fire Maidens of Outer Space!
Oh this is a CLASSIC!
And it's British!
And Jupiter looks suspiciously like Surrey!


A team of astronauts lands on a moon of Jupiter to find it populated with beautiful young women looking for mates. An old man explains to the explorers the group's story, as well as the moon's dangers.


The discovery of signs of life on the 13th moon of Jupiter leads to the sending of a crew of five chain-smoking male astronauts, armed with handguns, to investigate.

Here I shall point out the lack of space suits, the fact that they were walking around the 'ship' and they smoked the whole way. Oh and they can be contacted with the use of a standard telephone and they all have rather super hair! Splendid! We know how to travel through space in the UK!
Oh and this line is uttered while they watch a meteor storm: "Reminds me of my wife when she's mad!"



In Surrey, oops sorry, the moon with an atmosphere similar to Earth (funny that), they discover New Atlantis, a dying civilization which is a colony of the original Atlantis.



There are only seventeen people left, all women save for a single middle-aged man, Prasus, the girls' "father".

Prasus hopes the spacemen will stay and help him destroy the monster, "the man with the head of a beast".



Introducing Prasus's daughters:  nubile young ladies one and all in their mini skirted dresses. Could this be any more of a male fantasy?





Duessa, the leader of the women, determines to hold them captive to use as mates.
See, see! Male fantasy!

The monster lurks outside the city's walls, but breaks into the city and kills Prasus along with several of the women, including Duessa. It is killed by the earthmen, and the remaining women decide to let them return to earth. One of them, Hestia returns with them, and the astronauts promise to send spaceships back with husbands for the rest.
Yes, really.



This is a splendid bite of 1950's British sci-fi. I have a real soft spot for the utter bizarreness of it. 


Did you know ... This 1956 release take place on the 13th moon of Jupiter. The 13th moon of Jupiter was not discovered until almost two decades later, in 1974.

Monday, 17 April 2017

Billy Fury & Eddie Cochran


Billy Fury
Born
Ronald William Wycherley
17th April 1940 - 28th January 1983


Billy Fury was an early British rock and roll star who equalled the Beatles' record of 24 hits in the 1960s, and spent 332 weeks on the UK chart, without a chart-topping single or album.
He is also one of my absolute favourite British rock and rollers.


Journalist Bruce Eder stated, "His mix of rough-hewn good looks and unassuming masculinity, coupled with an underlying vulnerability, all presented with a good voice and some serious musical talent, helped turn Fury into a major rock and roll star in short order".


Others have suggested that Fury's rapid rise to prominence was due to his "Elvis Presley-influenced, hip-swivelling and at times highly suggestive stage act."


Today would have been his 77th birthday.
So here's to Billy, happy birthday!


* * *

Today also marks the passing of Eddie Cochran. Last years tribute post can be found here.
 

Photo taken by Andy


Friday, 24 March 2017

B-Movie Madness: Tarantula 1955



"I knew Leo G. Carroll
Was over a barrel
When Tarantula took to the hills ..."





A spider escapes from an isolated desert laboratory experimenting in gigantism and grows to tremendous size as it wreaks havoc on the local inhabitants.


A severely deformed man stumbles through the Arizona desert, falls and dies. Dr. Matt Hastings, a doctor in a nearby small town is called in by the Sheriff to examine the body at the local mortuary.

Asked to define the cause of death, he finds himself perplexed as the deceased was someone he knew and had just seen recently whose deformity appears to be acromegaly, a distortion which takes years to reach its apparent present state.

Dr. Hastings asks to be allowed to perform an autopsy to clarify the diagnosis but the sheriff refuses, judging an autopsy unnecessary because there is no indication of foul play.

Hastings then approaches Jacobs' colleague, Dr. Gerald Deemer (Carroll), who more bluntly refuses permission, then signs Jacobs' death certificate in lieu of Hastings, with heart disease listed as the cause of death.


Bothered still by the anomaly, and also by Deemer's abruptness, Hastings later drives to Deemer's combined home and research lab in the desert far from town.

Deemer apologizes for his hostility, blaming it on his grief, then insists that Jacobs had developed acromegaly incredibly rapidly, over just four days. He cannot offer an explanation but attempts to convince Hastings this was only an anomaly, not a result of anything sinister. Hastings appears to accept this apology.


After Hasting leaves, Deemer goes to his closed lab, where huge cages contain white rabbits and mice, some of enormous size. Deemer examines each of the oversized specimens, noting when each last received an "injection", and how many each has had altogether.

Then he turns to observe a glass-fronted inset in the back wall, as a different sort of specimen slides into view inside - a tarantula bodily the size of a large dog, plus legs.


As Deemer finishes his observations of this creature, a second deformed man appears, attacks Deemer and begins destroying the lab.

During this rampage the lab catches fire and the glass covering the tarantula's cage is shattered. The man grabs a hypodermic that Deemer was preparing, knocks him out and injects him with the contents.

As flames and electrical sparking rage over the lab, the arachnid escapes outdoors ...


Interestingly, Prof Deemer predicts that by the year 2000 the human population will be 3.6 billion. In fact it was almost double that at that time.


Clint Eastwood appears as the (uncredited) leader of the jet squadron that attacks the tarantula in the film's climax.



The starring spider also 'acted' in a previous film featured here on The Folly Bird: The Incredible Shrinking Man.


🎞📽🎞


Did I enjoy this?
I did actually, animals in laboratories aside, obviously.
It even made me jump in one place which I have never done before when watching one of these b-movies.